HOODED VULTURE – Extinction Realities

Scientific name: Necrosyrtes monachus(Temmink, 1823)
IUCN Status: Critically endangered as listed by IUNC 2015
Geographical location: They are endemic in sub-Sahara Africa (Odino et al., 2014)

Nomenclature:
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Accipitriformes
Family: Accipitridae
Genius: Necrosyrtes (Glogor, 1841)
Species: Necrosyrtes monachus (Temmink, 1823)

FACTS
They are among the smallest species of vulture and are named for the Scruff of white feathers that forms a collar around their neck. They have bare heads, and brown bodies (birddorable.com). They could inhabit the deserts, forest, savannah, and urban areas (Ogada and Buij, 2011), at the urban areas, they roost (breed and live) in close proximity with Human (Kibuule, 2016) on a tall tree with a preference for Bombax spp, which is 19m-28m tall and 110-163 diameter at breast height (Roberts, 2013). The species are scavenger feeding mostly in the morning, on human waste (carrion, household waste, etc.) according to Kibuule (2016), and could be found on a dumpsite, slaughterhouse and market places (Mullie et al., 2017)

ANONYMOUS INFORMATION
The animal was reported to be harmless to humans (Wikipedia) or the environment (flora and fauna), however, there were reports of attacks by the species on wounded or sick animals (Wikipedia). The animal was reported to defecate on their feet, so as to cool it off (naturemappingfoundation.org) and their fecal was reported to be white and fluid (loudounwildlife.org). Although the animal feed on dead animals or waste which may or may not be a carrier of deadly infectious organisms, or may have to be dead as a result of the infectious organism, the animal does not spread disease according to Blog.nationalgeograhic.org and washingtonpost.com reported that the Species has clean guts (76 different species of bacteria was recorded) while Human has between 300-1000 species of bacteria in their gut (Wikipedia), and 528 species of bacteria was found in their fecal (washigtonpost.com)

EXTINCTION REALITIES
TREAT INCLUDES Poisoning, traditional and spiritual hunting of the species, habitat loss, food decline, electrocution, disturbance of roosting sites, and Human consumption.
Sadly, in a report by Ogada and Buij (2011), Nigeria was reported to have a high demand of the animal in the market for spiritual purposes and where there is high consumption of the species. A product named “WormForce” (contains 3% Carbufuran) was said to have been produced in Nigeria and exported to Cameroon, which is being used to kill the species. The head is used to protect against witches, and the whole body is used for good fortune Ogada and Buij (2011). After killing the species, it will undergo a drying process and stored in a plastic bag by locals and be sold out. The head is sold for 5$, while a set comprising a head and feet are sold between 30-40$ in Cameroon (Ogada and Buij, 2011),

WHAT IF, THE ANIMAL GO INTO EXTINCTION?
Hooded Vulture plays a very key and important role in the ecosystem, as it helps to purify the environment from pathogen and deadly microbes that could potentially harm Human and his immediate environment. The vulture feeds on the carcass of animals, and their nitrifying threat by eating them. In other words, they help stop the spread of disease to Human and other animals

The loss of this wonderful and beautiful species, whom many people attribute to a bad sign and hunting to extinction, is helping humans live free from disease.

THE LOSS OF THIS ANIMALS SIGNIFY A POTENTIAL THREAT OF EPIDEMIOLOGY OF DISEASE, IS TIME WE ALL WORK TOGETHER AS ONE TO KEEP THIS ANIMAL SAFE, THE SAME ANIMAL THAT CONTRIBUTE SO MUCH TO HUMAN, YET TREATED SO UNFRIENDLY BY HUMAN.

REFERENCE
Kibuule, M. (2016). Population status of the critically endangered Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus) in Uganda major urban center, African Bird Club

Mullie, C.W., Couzi, F.X., Diop, M.S.., Piot, B., Peters, T., Reynaund, A.P. and Thiollay, J.M. (2017). The decline of an urban Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus) population in Dakar, Senegal over 500 years, Journal of African Ornithology. Doi.org/10.2989/0030625.2017.1333538.

Roberts, S.T.J. (2013). Estimating the population and distribution of Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus) of the Accrs metropolis area. African Bird Club

Ogada, D. and Buij, R. (20111). Large declines of the Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus) across its African Range. Ostrich.82 (2): 101-113

Odino, M., Imboma, T., and Ogada, L.D. (2014). Assessment of the occurrence and threats to Hooded Vultures (Necrosyrtes monachus) in western Kenya town, VultureNews. Doi.org/10.4314/vulnew.v65i1.1

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